Storytellers: Historic Home Tour 2017
Tour Stops


627 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Tim Williams)

627 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Tim Williams)

#1. 627 N. Cheyenne Ave.
Owners: Timothy Williams and Jonathan Brown
Date Built: 1909

Our 1909 Folk Victorian home was built from site made cinder blocks (a typical construction material of the era with use of a block machine). At the time of construction, a trolley ran down the middle of Cheyenne Avenue, making this a prime location for suburban homes. The floors, doors, windows, staircase and most of the trim are original to the house and made of old growth yellow pine; the porch columns and railing are also original, as is most of the floor plan. When Timothy purchased the house (27-Ish years ago) the house had been empty for 30 years and was condemned. A solid roof and stabilization were the first order of restoration, followed by 5 years of sourcing period trim and the restoration of 6 surfaces in every room (floor, ceiling, & 4 walls). There was no indoor kitchen and no electric (sadly no gasolier light fixtures remained). The only bathroom was a toilette hanging from what was left of the back porch (now the dead-animal-room). The deceivingly large cottage (3000sf). Has 5 bedrooms and 5 baths (including the mother-in-law quarters), a pool, hot tub, summer house/greenhouse, koi pond, double lot and covered parking.

628 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

628 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

#2. 628 N. Cheyenne Ave.
Owners: Jeremy and Jenna Brennan
Date Built: Early 1900s

Note: Home is being shown as a work-in-progress to demonstrate some of the tools and techniques used in proper historic preservation and restoration. Not all areas may be accessible during the tour.
This very early 1900's home is one of two nearly identical homes built next to each other.  It features some interesting wooden shingle siding on the upper story and a roomy asymmetrical front porch. The previous owner had done much work stripping and refinishing the trim, adding beautiful historic lighting and updating the electrical and plumbing.  Much of the structures of the original windows had rotted and are currently being rebuilt.  A local cabinet shop is rebuilding 6 of window sashes to match the originals.  The floors are softwood either pine of fire and have been covered with many layers of polyurethane.  As a typical drum sanding would remove too much wood to even them out, they appear to be good candidates for a passive wood floor restoration.  This process involves stripping the old finish with soy gel and hand scrappers to prepare it for the new finish.

716 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

716 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

#3. 716 N. Cheyenne Ave.
Owners: Ryan and Kim Harper
Date Built: 1908

"The Piano House' is constructed on property listed on the National Register of Historical Places. In 1903, the lot in the City of Tulsa, Indian Territory, was allotted to 6 year-old Ruth T. Brady in accordance with treaties between the United States of America and the Cherokee Nation. The house is constructed in the craftsman style typical to the Brady Heights neighborhood with an expansive front porch, supporting columns with brick piers, shingled siding and deeply overhanging eaves. In the 1940s, the house served as a 'lodging house.' Fully renovated in 2017 by Widell Renovations, be sure to pay special attention to the beautifully restored main staircase, the original pocket doors and the log cabin design wood floors. In recent years, the house has been lovingly nicknamed 'The Piano House' due to the antique player piano located on the front porch.

823 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

823 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

#4. 823 N. Cheyenne Ave.
Owner: Jeff and Kathy Weaver
Date Built: 1917
Note: Home is being shown as a work-in-progress to demonstrate some of the tools and techniques used in proper historic preservation and restoration. Not all areas may be accessible during the tour.

This was originally a 3 bedroom, 1 bath house and is being converted to a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. So come see the beauty of construction. We acquired this home in 2014. It was in very poor shape; center beam/wall sagged 6", the following items were in disrepair...windows in general, sheet rock, flooring & floor joists. The doors, cabinets, bathroom, casing, base boards were non-existing. Some of the work that has been done; center beam hydraulically "jacked up" to level, floor joist sistered, new floor insulation, sub-flooring, maple wood flooring, new doors, the original windows and window frames have been completed reworked, new sheet rock replaced both old damaged sheet rock and plaster, new casing and base board being installed and keeping with the craftsman style, period tile on the bathroom floor and walls. Before and after pictures will be available on the tour.

769 N. Denver Ave. (Photo © 2017 Chandra Hall)

769 N. Denver Ave. (Photo © 2017 Chandra Hall)

#5. 769 N. Denver Ave.
Owners: Chandra Hall and Mark Crowl
Date Built: 1917

Per the abstract and historical Tulsa newspapers, 769 N Denver was originally owned by the Kiscaden family. Mr. Kiscaden was a Police Commissioner and his wife was a musician and often entertained in her home which was next door at 773 N Denver. The Kiscaden home at 773 N Denver burned down in the 1930's. From the abstract it looks like 769 N Denver Ave was built as in investment to sell. The first purchaser after the house was built was Glenn J. Smith. Born in Deerfield, Ohio, Smith decided to "go west' at the age of 21 and came to Oklahoma, settling at Enid, then moving to Oklahoma City a short time later. He moved to Tulsa in 1916. Smith started in the oil business two years later as a land man in Ranger, Texas, for the Markham Oil Co. He drilled his first oil well in 1919 in Creek County near Jennings. He founded the Wood Oil Co. here in Tulsa in 1929. Smith owned the property at 769 N Denver from 1917-1922. When the demo was done in the basement one of the baseboards that was removed had "Kiscaden" written on it. This house is the only house in Brady Heights that still has the original rain water cistern in tact and working. It holds approximately 2500 gallons of rain water. In the early 1980's the siding was removed from the house to reveal the beautiful original shake shingle siding preserved and intact. Thankfully the wood wainscoting and built-in bookshelves were never painted and show their original glory.

902 N. Denver Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

902 N. Denver Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

#6. 902 N. Denver Ave.
Owners: Brian and Katelyn Parker
Date Built: 1911

This single story bungalow was built circa 1911 by architect James Patrick (J.P.) Curtin for himself and his wife Fannie.  J.P. Curtin came to Oklahoma in 1907 and would eventually design the Brady Mansion in the neighborhood. His home at 902 N. Denver Ave. was actually sold at sheriff's auction mid-construction due to failure to pay for the land; the lumber company that was building the home bought it at auction, finished the construction in 1913, and sold it back to the Curtins in Fannie's name. In the 1980s, the McDaniel family restored the home from condemnable condition and lived in it for 30 years until it was sold in 2011. The legacy of architects in the home continues with current resident Katelyn Parker, a licensed architect, and her husband Brian; they learned of the Brady Heights Historic District through taking the Home Tour themselves in 2011. The home has most of its original woodwork and features an incredible fretwork archway between the living room and dining room. The original fireplace is buff iron-speckled brick flanked by original 11-over-1 French casement windows with 100-year-old wavy cylinder glass. The home has 10 foot tall ceilings throughout, an antique claw foot tub, a pentagonal sunroom which is now the master bedroom, and a newly remodeled kitchen.

1145 N. Denver Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

1145 N. Denver Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

#7. 1145 N. Denver Ave.
Owners: Stan and Genyce Goodchild
Date Built: 1925

Identified by their barn-style roofs, there are four Dutch Colonials in Brady Heights. This home's inspiring architecture is a superb example of this style in stucco with a long-side entrance. The tree swing in the front yard, arched entry roof, and many windows reflect the neighborhood's culture of hospitality and the owners' heart of invitation. The floor plan of "The Parish House" is original, except for a kitchen layout modification that occurred circa 1940. The home has an expansive foyer; the first floor includes a library and sunroom. The second floor sleeping porch is now used as a study. The full basement includes a family room and bathroom, and large window wells allow for ample natural light. The detached two-car garage with upstairs living quarters and a large gazebo at the rear of the property complete the estate, which is set on a double lot. Major renovation to the first and second floors and the exterior by Taylor Construction from 2010 to 2014 erased the toll of time and neglect. The original grandeur of the rear veranda was revealed when a 1970s addition was removed and a double set of French doors reinstalled. The basement is currently being remodeled; other future renovation projects include new exterior paint and creating a two-story living space in the garage.

1140 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

1140 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

#8. 1140 N. Cheyenne Ave.
Owners: Kris Murray and Mery McNett
Date Built: 1919

Aspiring oilman Lewis R. Lewis and his wife M. Kate Lewis bought the lot where this house stands in 1916; in 1919, with the help of their friend Dr. M. P. Springer of Springer Clinics, they were able to build this lovely American foursquare which features a gorgeous original wood staircase, wood moldings, and original wood flooring. During the last decade, this house has been restored by a line of dedicated owners. The current owners plan to continue the renovations by removing the siding and restoring the original beauty underneath. Kris and Mery have affectionately given their house the name "Casa Azul" due to the eclectic Dia de los Muertos themed decor. Original art, including some of Mery's works, is featured throughout the house and many are available for purchase.

1151 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2016 Dani Widell)

1151 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2016 Dani Widell)

#9. 1151 N. Cheyenne Ave.
Owners: Will and Dani Widell
Date Built: 1914

This foursquare home features both Craftsman and Prairie influences. Guests walk up the front steps onto a traditional large and welcome Brady Heights' front porch. The home's craftsman influences are on immediate display once the front door is opened. Notable features include intricately patterned hardwood floors, a grand oak staircase, double arched entryways, and oversized windows. Coffered ceilings in both living and dining rooms create a sense of warmth and formality. The house was previously split into 3 apartments--possibly in the early 1940s when homes in the area were partitioned to provide housing for soldiers during World War II--and was suffering from half a century of neglect. The current owners purchased the home in 2015 and returned it to its original single-family design. While every effort was made to preserve as many of the traditional features as possible, visitors will experience yards of granite and marble in the modern kitchen and bathrooms. Today, renovations are about 90% complete and the house once again belongs in the neighborhood.

1152 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

1152 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

#10. 1152 N. Cheyenne Ave.
Owners: John and Debbie Robson
Date Built: 1925

This home had been condemned by the city, but was purchased and remodeled in 2011, at which time a master suite was added to the back of the house. The home was purchased by the current owners in 2015, at which time the entire first floor was completely remodeled by fellow Brady Heights resident Dani Widell and her team at Widell Renovations. Unfortunately, much of the home's original interior features were not salvageable during the first renovation, but original wood floors are still in place in two of the upstairs bedrooms.

1164 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

1164 N. Cheyenne Ave. (Photo © 2017 Brian Parker)

#11. 1164 N. Cheyenne Ave.
Owners: Chas and Robin Higgins
Date Built: 2017

The home was built in 2017. The home was built by and designed by Chas and Robin Higgins. The goal of the house was to offer a new construction option with the charm of the Brady Heights neighborhood.