frequently asked questions

On this page, you'll find some of the most frequently asked questions we've received about our neighborhood as well as our organization, along with our answers. If you have a question that you do not see an answer for here, feel free to fill out our Contact form and we'll add it to the list.


What are the boundaries of the Brady Heights Historic District?
In the by-laws of Brady Heights Historic District, Inc. as a nonprofit organization, the district's boundaries are defined as:
  • Marshall Street on the north;
  • the Inner-Dispersal Loop on the south;
  • the alley between North Cheyenne Avenue and Main Street on the east;
  • and the Osage Expressway (LL Tisdale Parkway) right of way on the west.

Similar boundaries are provided by the National Register of Historic Places listing for the district, as well as the Tulsa Preservation Commission's information page.

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When was the primary residential construction undertaken in the Brady Heights Historic District?
The primary contributing period of historic construction is largely recognized as between 1906 and 1925. In the application for recognition of the district on the National Register of Historic Places, it was recognized as the most complete pre-1920 neighborhood surviving in Tulsa.

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When was the Brady Heights Historic District placed on the National Register of Historic Places? When was it placed under Historic Preservation Overlay zoning protection with the Tulsa Preservation Commission?
Brady Heights Historic District was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980; it was the first neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma to receive such distinction.

Brady Heights Historic District was initially protected by Historic Preservation Overlay at the request of residents in 1999.

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What does Historic Preservation Overlay zoning protection mean if I own or want to purchase or rent a property in the Brady Heights Historic District?
As part of the closing documents on a home purchase in our neighborhood, buyers must sign an acknowledgment that the property they are purchasing is protected by Historic Preservation Overlay zoning. Historic Preservation Overlay zoning is overseen by the Tulsa Preservation Commission, an official entity of the City of Tulsa. Per the Tulsa Preservation Commission website:
"Any exterior alterations or repair, new construction, or demolition within a historic preservation zoned neighborhood must be approved first by the Tulsa Preservation Commission or its staff."

The Tulsa Preservation Commission website also details the process that homeowners must go through to obtain an Historic Preservation Permit to receive approval to do work on their properties in the district.

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What does it mean that the neighborhood organization is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit instead of a neighborhood association or homeowners association?

When the neighborhood organized a group of leaders to work on the improvement of Brady Heights Historic District in 1980, it did so as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with the confusing name of Brady Heights Neighborhood Association, Inc. That confusion was rectified in 2015 when the organization officially changed its name to Brady Heights Historic District, Inc.

A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization is an entity which can raise money to support charitable endeavors, and does not require membership dues to be paid by those people living in the area served. Donations to the organization are tax-deductible to the extent of the law thanks to this status. Since participation in the organization is not mandatory, the organization tends to operate on a smaller budget and does not have the capacity to support park maintenance or other costs in the area served. Such an organization is also typically purpose-driven and may have a smaller pool of members and volunteers as a result, and in some ways Brady Heights Historic District, Inc. is no different; per our by-laws:
The Objectives and Purposes for which the Corporation is formed are to restore and perpetuate the historical background of Brady Heights for the charitable purpose of: improving and beautifying the Brady Heights neighborhood; educating members in the prevention of residential burglaries and vandalism; supporting compliance with zoning codes and ordinances applicable to the area; and improving neighborhood and community relationships.

By contrast, neighborhood associations and homeowners associations often mandate a required payment of membership dues from those people living in the area served regardless of whether a homeowner or renter is an active participant in organizational business. These types of organizations use membership dues to perform maintenance around the area served and often support other amenities such as community pools, parks, or playgrounds. Because dues are required and cannot be opted out of, there is typically a larger budget to be spent on other things such as hiring a security company to watch the area. However, these organizations typically enforce strict mandates regarding the appearance of homes and lots in areas, including paint colors and landscaping. Contributions to many of these organizations are also typically not tax-deductible due to the lack of an established charitable purpose.

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