American Foursquare
Bungalow
Colonial Revival
Folk Victorian
Prairie School
Arts & Crafts
Plains Commercial
American Foursquare

American as apple pie and just as popular. These cubic houses are strongly identified with the period: They have lots of interior space in an efficient, affordable envelope. Earlier examples had Craftsman or Prairie School leanings, but most built after the mid-1920s were Free Classic houses, with round columns and turned balusters, six-over-one sash, sometimes even a Palladian window.

Bungalow

The Bungalow was popular between 1905 and 1930. This style was nationally fashionable as a middle-class, single-family dwelling. Most commonly interpreted in wood, the Bungalow had a low-pitched roof with wide, unenclosed eave overhangs. Exposed roof rafters and triangular knee brackets are present on most examples. A full or partial-width porch supported by tapered square columns and brick or stucco piers is also a hallmark of the style.

Colonial Revival

The identifying features of the Colonial Revival style, popular from 1910 until 1955, include an accentuated front door, a symmetrical facade, and a side-gabled roof with dormers. About ten percent have gambrel roofs. These houses are one story, but the steeply pitched gambrels contain almost a full second story. These may have separate dormer windows or a continuous shed dormer with several windows.

Folk Victorian

Popular between 1880 and 1910, typical two-story examples of the Queen Anne houses are difficult to find in Tulsa. Characteristics of this style include an asymmetrical facade, a steeply-pitched hipped roof with cross-gables, patterned shingles, bay windows, and a wrap-around porch

Prairie School

The Prairie School, one of the few American architectural styles, can be found in some of the additions platted prior to 1925. Generally two stories, examples of this style include a low-pitched, hipped roof, with widely overhanging boxed eaves and a one-story porch. A subtype, known as the American Foursquare or the Prairie Box, has a simple square or rectangular plan, low-pitched hipped room, and symmetrical facade. This style is common to several of the Tulsa residential areas.

Arts & Crafts

Striving for "honesty of design" is the hallmark of the Craftsman and Craftsman-style home. The magic of the Craftsman-style home was contagious. Homes designed by architectural leaders like the Greene brothers were huge, expensive, and well-appointed with every amenity. At the same time, plans for the rustic or "artistic" home were well within reach of those with more modest pretensions. Popularizing the style was largely the work of the indefatigable writers like Henry Wilson and Gustav Stickley. The low-slung rooflines reflect the influence of Oriental architecture on the style. These roofs typically have a wide, unenclosed eave overhang with decorative supports.

Plains Commercial

In the early 1900s a new commercial style developed as a reaction to the ornate Victorian architectural styles of the late nineteenth century. This style became popular because of its adaptability to a variety of building types, especially the new one-story, flat roofed commercial building. The character of the Early Twentieth Century Commercial buildings is determined by the use of patterned masonry wall surfaces,shaped parapets at the roofline that were often uninterrupted by a project cornice and large rectangular windows arranged in groups.